The Parisian Rules of Tipping

Sitting at the terrace of a sidewalk cafe in Paris and sipping on a Perrier while watching passers-by is a pleasure many travelers promise themselves to experience when they are in Paris. But with the check comes the question: to tip or not to tip?

The check is all inclusive

Unlike in America, cafes and restaurants in Paris directly include a 15% service charge in your check. This is required by French law as tips are assessed for taxation purposes.

The 15% service charge is clearly itemized on your check, on top of the VAT tax (a French version of the sales tax). The words ‘Service compris’ (Tip included) indicate that the tip has already been included in the total to be paid.

The good news is that prices rated on the menus are all-inclusive: they include both the 15% tip and the sales tax. There is no last-minute unholy surprise when you are given your check. What you saw on the menu is what you get charged for, no hidden extras.

So no extra-tips then?

Well, a small extra-tip is always appreciated of course. It’s the mark you were satisfied with the way you were served by your waiter (‘garçon’ in French, pronounced ‘Gar-son’ with the ‘on’ sounded like in ‘honking’ not like in ‘son’). It’s a sort of a ‘Thank You’ note. But you are under no obligation here.

Small extra-tips are also appreciated because they directly line your waiter’s pockets, unlike the 15% tip charge which is usually tallied up at the end of the day, and divided amongst all waiters. In some bars the owner may even keep the totality or part of the tip charge. French law does not require indeed that service charges be distributed to waiters. So your waiter might not even see a dime of it.

But once again, you paid your dues when paying your check, and you are under no obligation to extra tip.

How much should the extra tip be?

Extra tips may range from just a couple of Euro dimes for a coffee or a soft drink, to 1-5 euros for a lunch or dinner. A nice ‘Thank You’ is 5 to 10% of the total check. But once again, there is no obligation, and no steadfast rule as far as the percentage goes.

Tipping elsewhere

A tip is a valuable extra income for their beneficiaries.

Case in point: taxi drivers. The average driver employed by a cab company earns about €1,400 a month – which is roughly equivalent to $2,500 in New York City. This is for 10 hours of hard work per day. A few years ago, cab drivers used to work 14-15 hours a day, 6 days a week to pad up their wages. French law now forbids it. So tipping them 5-10% of your fare is generous.

It is customary to tip the usherette at the Opera house: a couple of euros are fine [the usherettes get also paid on sales of evening programs]. Give 50 euro cents the ushers at the movies. There was a time, not so long ago, when usherettes at movie theaters were not paid at all by theater operators. They lived on tips only. This is no more the case today and they are on salary, but usually no more than the minimum wage.

One euro per bag to your hotel porter should make him smile.

In some expensive restaurants, at classical concerts halls, or at the discos, ladies in the lobby usually take care of your coats. It is customary to tip 1 euro for every large item when you come back to pick up your belongings.

If you take a guided tour at the museum, you might leave 1 or 2 euros to your guide to thank him for imparting his knowledge to you.

Summing up

These are guidelines based on custom and experience. Yet they are not strictly followed. These advices apply as well in other parts of France, where your tips will be considered a mark of generosity on your part as the standards of living there are not as high as in Paris.

This is what tipping really is: a demonstration of generosity, and a way to express satisfaction for the service you were just provided.

Paris Off the Beaten Path: Try Small Museums

Small Paris museums offer you an alternative to the large venues when you wish to avoid the crowds there. See which museums to visit here.

Fan of Klimt, Schiele & Co., I recently wanted to take a leisurely look at the Grand Palais blockbuster exhibition on Vienne 1900. I picked a weekday mid-afternoon, assuming I could whizz in and loiter through. Oops! I lined up before the entry (in freezing weather) for over an hour. And when I got a glimpse of the over-populated jostling going on inside, threw in the towel.

If body-contact sport isn’t your ideal for expo-visiting in Paris (or elsewhere), try small museums.

Here’s a sampling of Parisian fares in this vein, where – despite the displays’ intrinsic interest, and English documentation generally available – you’re not likely to have your feet trampled or be elbowed in the ribs. Some are so tiny they aren’t mentioned in Bordas’ authoritative Guide des Musées de France.

Let’s begin by wandering down rue Antoine Bourdelle, 15e arrondissement (district) near the Gare Montparnasse. At no. 18 you can’t not notice, through a grillwork fence, a garden hosting a bronze horse almost two storeys high.

This is the Musée Bourdelle, former home and studio of the sculptor (1861-1929) for whom the street is named, and whose work – fittingly for a small museum? – was grandiose in intent and result. The style is somewhere between rough-hewn Rodin (with whom he collaborated for a while) and Art Déco’s wind-swept streamlining.

On view are samples of his inclination for antiquity and exoticism that range from statues of Sappho and Archer Heracles to a monumental portrayal of Polish national poet Mickiewicz and bas-reliefs of music, drama, etc. for the Théâtre des Champs Elysées, inaugurated in 1913. It was inaugurated with a scandalous premiere of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, danced by a rather lightly clad Nijinsky. That year Bourdelle exhibited work at New York’s landmark Armory Show.

Address:
18 rue Antoine Bourdelle
Paris 15th district
Open except Mondays and holidays 10 a.m.>6 p.m.
Full entry: €4.50; youth: €2.20; under 14: free.
Metro stations: Montparnasse, Falguière.

Just around the corner is the diminutive Musée du Monparnasse recalling such Roaring-’20s Montparnasse denizens as Hemingway, Picasso and Modigliani. It opened its doors in 1998 in a quaint paved street (Chemin du Montparnasse) which itself is worth the visit.

The museum offers its visitors a treasure trove of photographs taken by such luminaries as Robert Doisneau and Henri Cartier-Bresson, and many watercolours and prints by Montparnasse artists.

Address:
21 avenue du Maine
Paris 15th district
Open except Mondays and holidays 12:30 a.m.>7 p.m.
Full entry: €5; reduced: €4;
under 12: free;
Metro station: Montparnasse

Still closer to the Gare Montparnasse is the Musée de la Poste, an offshoot of the postal administration – and a good place to take the prettiest mail-woman in your neighborhood.

Opened in 1973, it’s a museographical surprise: you take an elevator to floor five then spiral down, room-to-room, to the ground floor.

Goodies along the way include: an articulated-arm Chappe semaphore (ca. 1800), part of a France-wide network enabling messages to come 10 km. station-to-station in clear weather from, say, Calais to Paris in just over an hour until France imported Samuel Morse’s system in 1856; a lovely 1900 ceramic post office counter; and an explanation of Paris pneumatique system that, 1866>1984, air-propelled correspondence via underground tubes at a speed of up to 700 meters a minute.

Address:
34 boulevard Vaugirard
Paris 15th district
Open except Mondays and holidays 10 a.m.>6 p.m.
Full entry: €5; reduced: €3.50;
under 18 and mailmen/women: free;
Metro station: Montparnasse.

And now, for gruesomely comic (?) relief : Paris’ Crime Museum a.k.a. Musée des Collections Historiques de la Préfecture de Police.

Can you imagine what early handcuffs looked – and felt – like ? Ouch ! They’re there. As are: a genuine guillotine blade, perhaps used on the murderer of a nearby victim’s punctured skull, and stark temporary exhibits.

A recent one of these documented oh-so-graphically the trials and tribulations of bagnards – forced-labor convicts transported to hellish camps in e.g. New Caledonia and French Guyana as late as 1953. Among them was the escapee-author of 1970s U.S. best-seller Papillon.

Address:
4 rue de la Montagne Sainte Geneviève
Paris 5th district
Open Monday through Friday 9 a.m.>5 p.m.
Free entry (except for executed criminals)
Metro station: Maubert-Mutualité

For wine buffs I can think of no place better than the Musée du Vin (Wine Museum). It opened its doors in 1984, and hunkers in 13th century quarries reconverted in the 16th-17th centuries by monks to store their wine (grapes grew abundantly on the Passy slopes, now facing the Eiffel Tower).

Ranging through time from Roman domination, and signposted by mini-Bacchus figures, displays include viticulturists’ tools, a barrel-maker’s workshop, and vessels for testing, storing, transporting and consuming the beverage.

The visit ends with… wine-tasting. You can also lunch there.
Thermal springs once flowed here, so the Wine Museum is on… rue des Eaux: Water Street!

Address:
Rue des Eaux – 5, square Charles Dickens –
Paris 16th district
Open Tuesday through Sunday 10 a.m.>6 p.m.
Entry: €8 (includes that glass)
Metro station: Passy

Best Beaches in Florida

Fort De Soto Beach is a historic fort built during the Spanish-American War located on Mullet Key. This 900- acre park has 7 miles of beaches, 2 fishing piers, picnic and camping areas, a small history museum and a 2,000-ft. nature trail.

Florida’s Gulf Coast, Caladesi is one of the few remaining large undeveloped barrier islands in Florida, and is only accessible by boat. It is an perfect locations for swimming, fishing, picnics, diving, hiking and nature study.

Key Biscayne’s beaches in Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park’s visitors can stroll by the Atlantic, charter a deep-sea fishing boat, ride a jet ski, or just relax. It’s one of the best places in Greater Miami for golf, sunbathing & water sports

Perdido Key is a natural paradise is home to plentiful native wildlife. The clear green waters and miles of soft white sand are perfect for sunbathing or water sports and it’s considered one of the America’s best swimming beaches.

South Beach is a happening hot-spot with a chic night life. The “American Riviera” is great for couples on spring break (that can afford it anyway) since rowdy crowds of teenagers are rarely seen on its upscale sands.

Greater Fort Lauderdale has 23 miles of sun-drenched beaches and is perfect for people watching or shopping and dining at any number of great beach shops and restaurants that line the clean and eco-friendly beaches.

St. Joseph Peninsula State Park’s miles of white sand beaches and striking dune formations characterize this Florida Panhandle area. Boating, saltwater fishing, camping, canoeing and hiking are all popular St. Joseph Peninsula activities.

Clearwater Beach offers nearly every water and beach activity conceivable, and nearby Pier 60 Park has a family recreation complex with playgrounds, fishing and concession stands.

Anastasia State Park is home to several rare, threatened and endangered species. Located on Anastasia Island, near St. Augustine, this beach provides opportunities for Camping, fishing, picnicking, hiking, beach volleyball, boating and more.
St. George Island State Park sits on 9 miles of undeveloped beaches and dunes. It is surrounded by the Gulf of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay, and is a perfect setting for a quiet Florida getaway.

Daytona Beach is called the “World’s Most Famous Beach”. Visitors can drive automobiles on the sand by day and stroll the boardwalk by night, stopping occasionally to enjoy the arcades. Daytona Beach is also a major surfing hotspot.

Siesta Key is one of the most popular the beaches on the southwest coast of Florida and is famous for its soft white sand. Amenities include lifeguards, concessions, picnic tables, grills, restrooms, showers & volleyball & tennis courts.

London calling

It’s hard to be hip – the endless guest-lists, the parties, the best seats in restaurants – but that’s not the half of it. It’s a very serious business indeed, calling (not unlike therapy) for years of total commitment and relentless hard work.

London has been characterized as one of Europe’s ‘hippest’ cities: for the inveterate traveller it’s a dream come true! If you’re looking for cool, happening and cutting edge, you’re in the right place. However, hipness is a minefield of hidden dangers: so a little advice… It’s better to be seen in a bar or a café than a restaurant. Tucking into a three-course meal will leave you out in the cold and hidden from view in a way that propping up a bar or hanging out in a café doesn’t.

There’s a trip to staying hip… here are some of the essential hipster’s restaurants, bars and clubs. There’s sure to be something here to lift your spirits and add to a great night out. Those searching for a fashionable spot won’t be disappointed, but London also caters for the student fraternity and those traditional bars serving true British ale and grub are equally trendy these days.

A Student Working Holiday is a good way to do London because at least you’ll have the cash to explore these happening haunts.

Burgundy Bens, Clerkenwell Road, is a traditional wine bar with a stylish interior, so go for the kill and dress to be noticed. Hip hotspots abound it this area, so get ready for some serious clubbing. Chill out in style at The Pulpit, Worship Street, which has a selection of every fabulous drink under the sun. The dress code is strictly casual: a perfect combination for those who want a low-key quality bar, where you can see and be seen.

If you’re looking for a venue that’s a bit more arty and laid-back, try the tucked away Phoenix Artist Club, Phoenix Street. Very impressive theatre-style décor and menu make Phoenix Artist Club a hidden treasure for late night drinking and fraternising. The lively Walkabout Inn, Henrietta Street, is the hip venue for South Africans and Australians, and a good spot for unusual beers and cocktails. Crowd is friendly and sociable.

Fluid, Charterhouse Street, is a trendy Japanese bar that provides the perfect venue for a fun meal of sushi and Tiger beer before hitting the clubs. Be elitist for a night and hang out at the coolest bar, Liquid Lab in City Road. With a medical and dental theme running throughout the décor, and a serious cocktail list, the Liquid Lab is a thoroughly modern venue.

Bars don’t come much trendier than The Box, Monmouth Street. Al fresco eating and drinking make it a great summer venue. A good place to do a bit of celebrity spotting, and a good excuse to get dressed up. For an eclectic mix, check out Charlie Wright’s International Bar , Pitfield Street, for an amusing and unusual crowd who love Charlie’s for its international menu of beers and lagers; offering everything from Japanese beer to Bulgarian lagers.

Are you looking for serious cocktails and house music? The Zoo Bar, Bear Street, is the place to get you on your feet and dance. Well known for its heady mix of cocktails and top-notch house music. Know your Glam American House from your Eurohouse! A visit to the legendary Velvet Room, Charing Cross Road, is a must for all serious musicians. This intimate venue has played host to some real superstar DJs over the years.

Those looking for real soul with a sexy atmosphere should check out Vivo in Watling Street. This place hosts some of the best soul and funk acts and DJs in the country.

Renting A Motor Home To Travel New Zealand

Whether you crave a holiday full of outdoor adventure or a relaxing vacation sampling gourmet cuisine and award winning wines, New Zealand has something for everyone. And, there is no better way to explore this highly diverse country than to rent a New Zealand motor home. With many tourist destinations within a few hours of each other and a well-maintained network of roads and highways, renting a motor home or camper van in New Zealand provides travelers the freedom and flexibility to experience all of the sites and attractions while enjoying all of the comforts of a home on wheels.

With many companies specialising in renting motor homes in New Zealand, it’s helpful to compare prices and availability on the internet. Rates tend to be higher during the summer months of December through February, and the best deals are to be had from May through September. Reputable rental companies will offer comprehensive insurance, roadside assistance, and 24-hour customer service. Other features that are also frequently offered when renting a camper van in New Zealand include itinerary planning, kitchen utensils, linens, unlimited mileage, ferry booking assistance, airport pickup, and luggage storage.

Camp ground facilities throughout New Zealand are generally very well maintained and in convenient, and often times, scenic locations. Along with BBQs, kitchen facilities, restrooms and showers, most campgrounds have laundry rooms and playgrounds. It’s always a good idea to reserve space at a campground prior to arrival, especially during the peak season of summer. Although most New Zealand motor homes and camper vans have a shower and toilet on board, it is illegal to discharge this waste into anything other than an approved dump station. Keep New Zealand clean and green. Should you dump the waste elsewhere it will end up in out pristine waterways. The main pick up and drop off cities for a New Zealand motor home or a New Zealand camper van are Auckland and Christchurch, although some companies have an office in Wellington, Picton or Queenstown. One way hires have a minimum hire period. It is also legal to park motor homes in New Zealand on national park land as long as there is not a “Parking Prohibited” sign posted.

Most first time visitors of New Zealand visit both the North and South islands to experience the vastly different landscapes. Camper vans and motor homes can be conveniently driven onto the Interislander ferry for the three hour journey between the islands. Most rental companies will gladly book reservations for the ferry and provide you with all of the information that you will need prior to setting sail.

When touring the stunning beauty of the South Island, it’s especially important to be aware of the weather. Snow frequently falls in the winter months, and chains are required on some roads. The speed limit on New Zealand open roads is 100 km or about 62 miles per hour. To have a safe motoring holiday, it’s essential to stay within the speed limit and to obey all of the traffic signs. Many of the roads, while well paved and signed, are somewhat narrow and often slick from rain or ice. Photo radar is used throughout the country to enforce the speed limits, and there are strict laws forbidding drinking and driving.

New Zealand is an amazing country with plenty to offer every traveler, and motor homes and camper vans allow the convenience, comfort, and flexibility to make the most of your holiday. Without wasting time checking into hotels or unpacking and packing up cars and suitcases, you can spend your time enjoying the sites and relaxing in your home on wheels. Happy Motoring!

Preventing Cancer

Governments throughout the world rarely tell their populations what the individual can do to prevent a disease occurring in the first instance. While all the emphasis is put on building more hospitals, better equipped hospitals and reducing waiting lists, lowering the need for hospital space by preventing diseases largely gets ignored.

Cancer is a good example of a disease where its strike rate can be greatly reduced by the individual taking precautionary measures. The incidence of cancer can, in some cases, be reduced by more than 50% by taking simple preventative actions.

The first preventative measure that should be taken is adequate exposure to direct sunlight.The effect of direct sunlight on the skin produces vitamin D, which is vital to good health. While some vitamin D can be obtained from food sources, the individual is unlikely to get enough from sources other than the sun. The exposure for white people need only be 10-15 minutes a day 3 or 4 times a week. However,the further you live from the equator, the more exposure you need.It should be noted that people with dark skin pigmentation require 20 times the exposure stated above to create the same amount of vitamin D. Sufficient levels of vitamin D are crucial to calcium absorbtion in the intestines.

The individual can further reduce his/her susceptibility to this disease by the choice of foods eaten at meal times. Limit your intake of meat, butter, eggs and cheese.These animal fats increase your risk of developing certain types of cancer (breast, prostate, intestine and pancreas). Eat more fish and poultry instead.

Eating a lot of fresh fruit and vegetables ( tomatoes, carrots,leeks,cabbage,broccoli and onions etc ) helps protect the body against cancer of the colon,stomach, rectum and lungs.These are also rich in vitamins A, B and C, all of which help to fight free radicals and thereby prevent cancer.

Eat wholegrain bread for its fiber content.Fiber improves intestinal functions and helps protect against colon cancer.

Get as much vitamin C as possible by eating fruits like kiwi,apple. black currant, raw turnip,sorrel, raw green pepper, raw green cabbage and citrus fruits. Also season salads with parsley which is very rich in vitamin C.

Avoid smoked, salted and barbecued foods which contain substances that are potentially carcinogenic, especially as far as stomach cancer is concerned.

Due to the variables with food dependent upon where it came from, how it is stored, how fresh it is and how it is cooked, it may be prudent to take a multivitamin and mineral tablet to ensure there are no deficiencies. The vitamins crucial to preventing cancer are A, the B-complex group, C, D and E. As vitanins are largely ineffective without minerals, it is best to take a combined vitamin and mineral tablet. These are readily available in health food shops, or can be ordered over the Internet for delivery via the mail.

Don’t let yourself get too fat: persons who are 40% or more above their normal weight stand a much higher risk of getting cancer.

The above simple measures should cut in half the likelihood of you contacting cancer in your lifetime!.

Africa – The Cradle of Humankind

World-renowned archaeologist Professor Phillip Tobias once said that “Humanity was a gift from Africa to the World”. Many scholars believe Africa to be the birthplace of mankind and with the substantial archaeological findings in their favour the world tends to agree.

South Africa – Tour the Origins
South Africa is home to some three million years of prehistory and history, inherited from the ancient cultures which made the mountains and plains their home. This rich inheritance places the country among the few regions in the world where these footsteps towards the development of culture can be followed. If you are interested in the origins of mankind a trip to South Africa is highly recommended. There are a multitude of sites where remarkable discoveries have been made throughout the years and they are now open to members of the public. The tours of these sites allow enthusiasts a glimpse into their own origins.

Until 1924 the world had focussed its attention on Asia in their quest for the origins of mankind. Professor Raymond Dart revolutionised this way of thinking when he discovered the skull of a six year old child in a block of rock sent to him from the town of Taung in South Africa’s North West province. The skull displayed both ape-like and human-like anatomical features and was named Australopithecus africanus. The skull is regarded amongst the 20 most significant scientific discoveries of the 20th century. Once the skull had been discovered scientists turned their attention to South Africa and a huge number of archaeological sites were found. The Taung Heritage Site is now one of South Africa’s top tourist destinations, a monument has been built to commemorate the discovery and an old mine tunnel has been reopened for visitors to explore. The Blue Pools are another feature that attract visitors to the Heritage Site. Discovered after a dynamite explosion in a mountain in which lime was being mined the pools are surrounded by caves and streams and are a popular site for hiking, abseiling, picnicking and barbequing.

Another remarkable find was made in 1947 by Dr Robert Broom, who discovered a perfectly preserved adult Australopithecus africanus cranium, belonging to the 2, 5-million-year-old “Mrs Ples”, at Sterkfontein. Several hundred discoveries followed, some dating back 3, 5 million years and the Sterkfontein site earned its name – The Cradle of Humankind. Some of the cradles findings include 500 skull, jaw, teeth and skeletal fossils of early hominids, thousands of other animal fossils, over 300 fragments of fossils wood, and over 9,000 stone tools. The Cradle of Humankind is a World Heritage Site and certain areas are open to the public. There are also various exhibitions, guided tours and lectures from reputed archaeologists. The Cradle restaurant is the perfect day of exploration and enlightenment. This beautiful restaurant built from stone, steel and glass opens up on three sides with a magnificent view of the African landscape.

South Africa’s Limpopo province is a land of myths and legends – the area has a rich cultural history and there are many archaeological sites. The Makapans Cave and nearby archaeological and fossil sites are situated on the farm Makapansgat, 19 km north of Mokopane. It was here in 1948 that the fossil remains of Australopithecus africanus, a 3, 5 million-year-old ape-man, were found by Raymond Dart. The Makapans Valley, a National Heritage site and currently in line for World Heritage Status, contains an extensive and complete record of hominid occupation. The Makapan caves are full of fossils and archaeological remains and you can take a tour of the caves and area.

Long before Bartholomew Dias rounded the Cape in 1488 the art of working gold was being mastered by Bantu-speaking people living near the Limpopo River. Recently gold objects and other exciting finds have been made here. Also near the Limpopo River, Thulamela in the Kruger National Park was home to a large stone-walled settlement. A large section of the ancient stone walling has been restored to its former glory and the National Parks Board is working on plans to make this bewitching site a tourism destination in the northern part of the Kruger National Park. Not only can you marvel at the sites archaeological finds but you can also enjoy spending time in one of the worlds most acclaimed game reserves.

In more recent years South Africa has once again captured the world’s attention with the discoveries of human remains at the Klasies River Caves along the Eastern Cape coast. Human remains with anatomically modern features have been found, dating well over 100 000 years old. If these dates are correct, then it is in Southern Africa that the world’s oldest remains of our own species, Homo sapiens, have been found – some 60 000 years before their arrival in Europe and Asia.

Apart from all of the human remains discovered in South Africa throughout the years the treasure trove of art. South Africa has the greatest collection of Stone Age paintings and engravings in the world. The San have left us a priceless and unique artistic legacy.

Robert Ardry wrote that, “Humanity evolved beneath the canopy of African skies on the immense card table of the African Savannah”. Exploring this evolution is a magnificent way to gain insight into the origin of mankind. Not only will you be enlightened on your tour of South Africa’s archaeological treasures you will also get to experience this beautiful countries modern day treasures.

Budget Travel and Having Fun While Doing It

Traveling can be expensive. Sometimes there is just no other choice but to travel and it may not be something that you want to spend a lot of money on. There are some ways that you can save money while traveling and still have a comfortable and enjoyable trip.

How to save money by flying
If you have to travel remember that holidays are the best days to fly. Thanksgiving is a great day because hardly anyone will be flying that day. The day before and the day after a holiday are the worst days to travel. These are the busiest days of the year to be on a plane. Pack light when you are traveling. Extra baggage could cost you time and money and you can save by packing a little less and you will save a lot more.

Take a train instead of flying
Trains are a great way to travel because they are usually less expensive than a plane. They are also less crowded. When you decide to take a train you will save money that can be used for other things on your vacation.

Traveling with your children can sometimes be a little stressful and maybe even a downright nightmare. However, this does not have to be the case. There are ways for you to keep your children occupied while you are on the road or in the air. You can keep them happy and at the same time keep your sanity.

Bring along some snacks
The one thing you can always depend on is your child getting hungry. They are always asking for a snack or something to nibble on at the worst possible times. These times are when you are busy or when you have nothing for them to snack on. One good way to prepare for this situation is to bring along a variety of their favorite things. Another good idea is to have some drink boxes on hand for them also. You know if they are hungry then the next thing they are going to say is they are thirsty. Think ahead and get a list of the things they like and pack them along with you.

When you are traveling either alone or with your family, bring your own snacks. This will save you time and money when you get hungry. Sometimes with the hustle of traveling we forget to get ourselves something to eat. This may cause an all of sudden sick feeling for you. By having some snacks on hand you will save yourself the trouble of feeling sick. This will also save you money. Snacks on coach flights and sections are not free and can be expensive in some cases.

Driving in a car
When you are driving to your destination, there are some things that you can do to save yourself money. Remember to not drive too fast. Driving fast can cause your car to use more fuel. It may also get you a speeding ticket, which will cost you a lot of extra money in the end. It is better to stay at a steady and safe speed while you are driving. Also bring your own food. Make up some sandwiches and bring along some sodas and water. This will save you money and time by not having to stop for food.

Another good piece of advice when traveling by car is to take turns driving with someone. Make sure that you have another safe driver for times when you need a break. You can sleep while someone else drives for a while and then switch back and forth when a rest is needed. This will save you the expense of paying for a room and get you to your destination sooner.

If you are traveling with children on a plane, remember to arrive at the airport early. Make sure that you allow yourself plenty of time to get you and your children checked in and not to mention leave yourself some time for bathroom breaks. You know how kids can sometimes slow you down and you want to make sure that you have enough time for the unexpected things that can come up at any given time.

Traveling with your children can be memorable experience in your life and with a little planning and thought; you can make that memory a great one.

Planning a Vacation? How about Disneyland!

After working hard all year long, everyone deserves a vacation to relieve all the stress and to enjoy time with friends and family. This is why it’s important to choose a destination that will fulfill all expectations…Disneyland!

As many go on holiday with family, it is essential that there is something to enjoy for all members of the family, and this is certainly the case at Disneyland. Surprises are always welcomed, but if you have children and you decide to spend your vacation in a city that has nothing fun to offer them, then the surprise turns into a nightmare. Going away from friends, even if for a week, seems to children something that requires an effort, so try and make then want that vacation by offering them exciting with plenty of things to do, things that can combine education and pleasure.

The choice of Disneyland vacation destinations is entirely yours. Depending upon a number of factors you may choose to visit Disneyland in Paris, Florida, California, or Tokyo. This will depend on how far you are willing to travel, your vacation budget, and if there are any other attractions that you may wish to visit whilst there. All offer great features for kids and adults to enjoy, and there is always plenty going on at all times of the day to ensure that no-one gets bored.

Maybe Disneyland isn’t for you, but of course there are wonderful places to visit all around the world. If budget allows it, you can make a trip around the world to visit the seven world’s wonders, which will be something that you will never forget. The Pyramids for instance are mysterious buildings, dated since the ancient Egyptians, enclosing a technology and architecture that can hardly be matched even in today’s world. Go and walk through these world wonders to try and understand the mystery, to see for yourself the simplicity of the people and the splendor of the country.

Vacation can simply be spent at home also. We can just relax and catch up on lost sleep if we feel too exhausted to travel. Meeting friends, having barbecues, sitting by the pool and playing with children will make us forget the hard year that passed. However, make sure one of your vacations is spent at Disneyland; it really is a “must-do” vacation that shouldn’t be missed.