How To House Train Your Dog Effectively

House training is one of the most important parts of training any dog to be a valued part of the family. As with many other aspects of dog training, the best way to house train a dog is to use the dog’s own nature to your benefit.

The great thing about dogs, and the thing that can make house training much easier, is that dogs are instinctively very clean animals. Dogs would rather not soil the areas where they sleep and eat. In addition, dogs are very good at developing habits regarding where they like to urinate and defecate.

For example, dogs that are used to eliminating on concrete or gravel will prefer to eliminate there rather than on grass or dirt. It is possible to use these natural canine habits when house training your dog.

Setting up the training area
The first step in house training your dog is to set up your training area. A small, confined space such as a bathroom, or part of a kitchen or garage, works best as a training area. This method of training differs from crate training. Crate training is great for puppies and small dogs, but many larger dogs find a crate too confining.

It is important for the owner to spend as much time in the training area with his or her dog as possible. It is important for the owner to play with the dog in the training area, and to let the dog eat and sleep in that area. The dog should be provided with a special bed in the training area, anything from a store bought bed to a large towel to a large box. At first, the dog may eliminate in this area, but once the dog has recognized it as his or her own space, he or she will be reluctant to soil it.

After the dog has gotten used to sleeping in the bed, the owner can move it around the house, relocating it from room to room. When you are not with your dog, the dog should be confined to the training area.

Setting up the toilet area
The second part of house training is to set up the toilet area for the dog. It is important for the dog to have access to this place every time he or she needs to eliminate. It is also important for the owner to accompany the dog each time until he or she gets into the habit of eliminating in the toilet area. This will ensure that the dog uses only the established toilet area.

A set feeding schedule makes the house training process a lot easier for both the owner and the dog. Feeding the dog on a regular basis will also create a regular schedule for the dog’s toilet habits. Once you know when your dog is likely to need to eliminate, it will be simple to guide the dog to the established toilet area.

Once the dog has established a toilet area and is using it on a regular basis, it is very important to not confine the dog without access to the toilet area for long periods of time. That is because if the dog is unable to hold it, he or she may be forced to eliminate in the training area. This habit can make house training much more difficult.

Continuing the house training process
After the dog is consistently eliminating in the toilet area and not soiling the training area, it is time to extend that training area to the rest of the home. This process should be done slowly, starting with one room and slowly expanding to the rest of the house. The area should only be extended once you are sure of the dog’s ability to control its bladder and bowels.

When you first expand the training area to a single room, let the dog eat, play and sleep in that room, but only when supervised. When it is not possible to supervise the dog, place it back in the original training area. Then, after the dog has accepted the room as an extension of the original training area, the area can be extended.

Speeding up the process
If this process is too lengthy for your needs, it can be speeded up, but it is important to proceed cautiously. It is easier to take your time up front than to retrain a problem dog later. One way to successfully speed up house training is to praise and reward the dog each and every time it uses the established toilet area. It is also important not to punish the dog for mistakes. Punishment will only confuse the dog and slow down the house training process.

How to Grow Roses – Five Important Steps

The rose is the most beautiful flower in the world, as least in my opinion and also in the opinion of hundreds of thousands of others around the world. Anyone can learn how to grow roses with a little instruction.
Growing roses is not as difficult as some make it seem and the amazing blooms that result from your effort are extremely rewarding. All you need is a desire to grow these beautiful flowers and some basic knowledge of gardening.
As you move forward, it would be wise to learn a little more about rose gardening in particular. Educate yourself to the specific needs of roses, which must be met in order for them flourish.
This article will give you a brief overview of five key steps.
First, rose plants require sunlight – at least six hours of unfiltered sunlight every day. Even if the planting instructions state that a particular species will do well in the shade, they will still need a minimum of four hours of direct sunlight to be at their best.
The second is well-prepared soil. Roses require nutrient-rich, well-turned soil, which means that you must take the time to prepare it properly. Then, once the roses are planted and begin to grow, they must be fed at regular intervals to keep them happy and healthy.
Check with your local nursery for recommendations. Preparation of the soil and the nutrients that must be added will vary depending on the climate and soil conditions of your area. I highly recommend that you use organic products as much as possible.
The third is proper watering. For the roots to grow deep, the plants must be soaked at least once a week. The frequency will vary depending on your climate, so check with an expert.
Frequent, shallow watering will cause the roots to stay near the surface, making them more susceptible to damage when there are high temperatures and extended dry spells.
Fourth – there is no doubt that you will have to deal with pests from time to time. Rose bushes are susceptible to a number of damaging insects – rose midge larva, rose cane borer, thrips, Japanese beetles, stem girders, aphids, rose slugs, mites, caterpillars, scale insects, and rose chafers.
Pests are annoying, but can be controlled. So, if you want to protect your plants, you must take care of the problems as quickly as possible, whatever they are. Once you know the type of bug you are dealing with, you will usually have several options for treating them.
If there is only an occasional bug, you can try removing them and the entire leaf on which they are found and destroy everything. However, you must watch the plants closely after that to see if you solved the problem. It is easy to miss eggs that have already been laid on the underside of neighboring leaves.
If you hate pesticides and toxic chemicals as much as I do, you can always try using the natural enemies of the pests. Lady bugs and some types of wasps (although not a favorite of mine) eat pests that can damage rose bushes.
Check with your local garden center to see if this is an option for you when dealing with the type of pests that you have found. You may also be able to find information Online.
Sometimes you are forced to resort to using the synthetic or natural chemicals to help you get rid of the pests. Always follow the directions carefully when applying any type of chemicals, which can be harmful to people and pets if used improperly.
And finally, number five. Everyone knows that roses must be pruned. This is a critical step to have full-blooming plants. For the majority of rose plant it is quite easy if you have heavy-duty gloves and good pruning shears.
Proper pruning in the spring before the blooming season begins is the recommended time for full pruning. It is important to remove dead twigs and leaves to allow for proper air ventilation and new growth. Pruning can also be used to shape the bush and train it to grow the way you want it to grow.
Cutting the roses as they bloom is part of the ongoing pruning process. I love the fact that I am supposed to cut my roses because there is nothing quite as lovely as fresh roses in the home. If the flowers are allowed to wither on the vine, the rose will set seed and stop producing new flower shoots.
Many gardeners believe that a garden is incomplete without one or several rose bushes, and I am one who agrees with that opinion. There are so many varieties it should not be difficult to find at least one or two that suit your preferences in color, shape and even fragrance.
If you take the time to learn how to grow roses correctly, your effort will be rewarded with amazing flowers that will beautify your garden from early spring until the cold sets in, and grace your home with elegance for years to come – two wonderful gifts that you should definitely give yourself.

Creating a Lavender Garden

When most people think of lavender they think of hot summer days, that heady distinctive scent and the gentle buzzing of bees; an image that has made it one of the most popular garden plants. Originally from the Mediterranean region and India, the lavender species is now cultivated all over Europe. Its uses are documented as far back as Roman times when it was used to scent their bath water. Indeed it was the Romans who first introduced the plant to Britain.
Lavender is a large family of plants, some annual, others perennial, some hardy and others tender. It is a plant well worth collecting and if you have some space in your garden, why not create a small garden devoted to the species. Here is a short guide to creating a small lavender garden which measures 15 feet square, including preparation, types of lavender you might like to grow and some companion plants.
Preparing the ground
Lavender prefers well-draining soil and a warm sunny aspect. However, it will grow in semi-shade as long as the soil conditions are right. Most lavenders are quite hardy and should survive winter temperatures, but if you live in an area with very cold winter temperatures it might be worth considering growing the plants in containers so that you can more easily protect them in severe weather.
If your soil is clay you will need to dig in plenty of organic matter followed by sharp sand in order to improve the drainage. Mark out the area you want to plant. In a square area it is a good idea to divide it up into four smaller squares with narrow paths running through so that you can easily access the plants.
Lavender plants
When deciding which species to include in your garden, there are a few things you will need to consider. How large will a particular species grow? Is it hardy? It is a good idea to grow a range of varieties in groups to achieve an overall effect of shape, size and colour. Plant in groupings of 3-5 plants for maximum impact. For larger varieties choose augustifolia or English Lavender, which is a hardy evergreen perennial. It grows to a height of 32ins with a spread of 3ft and has mauve/purple flowers on long spikes in summer. If you are keen to try and distil your own lavender oil, then choose Lavender Grosso which is a cross between augustifolia and latifolia and the choice of most commercial growers. The species is very tall growing and is good for making lavender wands and the flowers are good for making sachets. Lavender Hidcote is another good variety. This hardy evergreen perennial grows to a height of around 18in and has dark blue flowers on medium spikes in summer. Lavender Rosea has pink flowers in summer and very aromatic leaves.
Lavenders known as French Lavenders are only half hardy but are well worth growing for their attractive coloured bracts in summer. Lavender Pedunculata grows up to 24ins and has attractive purple bracts with an extra mauve centre tuft.
If you want some smaller growing varieties for the front of borders or to infill, then choose Lavender Folgate, Lavender Lodden pink or blue, and Lavender Munstead. Medium varieties include Lavender Bowles and Lavender Old English.
Maintenance
The best way to maintain a healthy lavender bush is to trim it to shape every year in spring, taking care not to cut into the old wood which will not sprout again. Once the flowers have gone over, trim back to the leaves. You can also trim the plant again in early autumn. Regular trimming in this way will keep a neat shape and encourage new growth.
If you want to gather lavender flowers for sachets or to dry as bunches, it is best to cut them just as they open. Dry the flowers by hanging them in small bunches. The leaves can be picked at any time to use fresh.
Container growing
If you choose to grow your lavender in containers make sure you choose garden planters that show the lavender off well. All lavenders look good in terracotta. Choose a well-drained compost and grit mix. Position your container in a sunny position. Although lavender will grow in partial shade, it can affect the scent of the plant. Water well and feed during the summer months. In winter allow the plant to dry out completely and then re-introduce water slowly in the spring.
Companion planting
You may wish to grow other plants alongside your lavender. If you have used a square design you could edge each square in low box hedging which will enclose the lavender plants in a straight edge of dark evergreen foliage. Other plants that grow and look well with lavender include other heat tolerant plants such as Santolina or cotton lavender, Rosemary and Oregano. Echinacea and Scabiosa are other good choices. Coleus adds a good colour contrast to the silvery grey of lavender leaves.

 

How to Grow Strawberries At Home

This how to grow strawberries article will guide you and help you reap those delicious red berries year after year. Every garden should have multiple strawberry plants growing in them. They are fragrant and beautiful and one of the first to produce its fruit in the spring. Each healthy strawberry plant should yield you about a quart of strawberries. This can help you decide how many to plant.
The first thing you need to do is choose what type of strawberries you want to plant. The following will give you some insight into three types of berries. Look at what space is available for your berries and this will help you determine the one to choose.
There are June Bearing plants which are the most common planted. Typically you will get the largest variety of fruit from this plant. Remember that this plant does produce runners, so you will need to allow for the adequate space. Allow these runners to grow they will help root your plant and increase your next year’s crop yield.
The Ever-bearing plant is another option to look at. It produces several harvests, usually three. It will produce in Spring, Summer and the Fall. Another thing to consider is that with these berries they do not produce runners.
These plants grow wild in Europe and are cultivated there. This strawberry plant made its way to North America around the 1900’s. It is a very popular plant also. The first year your crop is planted you should remove all the blooms and allow it to anchor its rooting system. This seems to defeat the purpose but it will establish a good root system and make next year’s strawberry yield worth the wait.
The final choice is called the Day Neutral. This plant does not just produce a single crop. Instead it will produce and yield berries through out the summer and into the fall months. Day Neutral plants will continue to produce a harvest until the frost comes. Day Neutral refers to the light sensitivity and will produce even with short sunlight days. This one is very popular in more mild temperatures.
Now you need to choose a site for your planting. You want to choose an area that drains well and one that gets full sun access. Planting each plant about five to seven inches in width and deep enough to cover the root system. Plant them approximately twelve to eighteen inches apart, this way you can easily get between them and weed or fertilize.
How do you grow strawberries and yield the best fruit? Well it all begins with choosing the plant then allowing it to have the best soil and providing it with enough water to assist it in its growth. Strawberry plants need about an inch each week to thrive. Allow the water to seep into the group gently as opposed to just dumping water on the plant. Regularly prune and make sure you pick the fruit the day it ripens.